Horniman Museum

Before Lockdown Two The Horniman Museum reopened to the public, so a small, socially distanced group of City Adventurers booked tickets to visit.

Horniman museum - photo by Juliamaud
Horniman museum – photo by Juliamaud

After lunch in the Horniman Café, we donned our face coverings and entered the museum. The first area we came to was the Natural History Gallery.

The Horniman contains over 250,000 items collected from the mid-19th to the early 21st centuries. The Natural History Gallery includes taxidermy, skeletal material, pinned insects, fossils, minerals, rocks, models, dried pressed plants, fungi, shells, and birds’ eggs. Prominently displayed is the one-tonne Horniman Walrus.

The one-tonne Horniman Walrus – photo by Juliamaud

We followed the designated pathway to The World Gallery. This celebrates human creativity, imagination and adaptability. Hanging in the ceiling vault above were kites and banners.

Next we moved on to the music gallery, which displayed the Horniman’s comprehensive collection of musical instruments. From the oldest is a pair of bone clappers (in the form of human hands made in Egypt around 3,500 years ago) to electric guitars and synthesizers, the museum has over 9,500 objects made to produce sound.

Once again, following the latest government guidance, the Museum and Butterfly House are closed. The Gardens, however, remain open, including the Café and kiosks and Gardens toilets. Visitors must continue to follow social distancing and the latest safety advice.

The Horniman is a charity and every day that the Museum is closed means that they lose vital income that is needed to help care for their animal residents, and to continue to maintain our Gardens. Please consider making a donation to the Horniman.


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